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Picking the comparison between locks and borders


I was listening to this episode of the podcast 99% Invisible that I warmly recommend to anyone curious. It's an episode about locks, and how they were unpickable for a while. What struck me is the following statement:
The lock on your front door is probably pretty easy to pick, but using a crowbar or going through a window would probably also suffice. It’s not just locks that keep us safe — it’s the existing social order. Today, locks have become a social construct as much as they are a mechanical construct.

It reminded me of an argument someone used with me about borders, and how they should be "secure". This person rhetorically asked me if I left my front door unlocked, and if yes it meant that I should support closed borders as well. I thought the two propositions didn't have much in common, but I realize I was wrong.

Like door locks, border security isn't about the thickest wall, it's about social inequalities between countries. You can spend a ridiculous amount of money on your door lock, it won't matter either if nobody's... show more


 

Can you predict the outcome of the 2017 UK general election?


@bgcarlisle asked me if I wanted to virtually wage on the results of the upcoming election in the United Kingdom. I respectfully declined because my knowledge of UK politics is shallow at best, however I thought that maybe some people that follow me could be interested.

The Grey Literature — Can you predict the outcome of the 2017 UK general election?

In 2015, I posed the following question to the internet: Can you predict the outcome of Canada’s 42nd federal election? I collected 76 eligible forecasts of seat counts for the major political parties in Canada and analysed them.1 The answer was “no,” but the results continue to be informative, especially now that everyone looks back on the e...
#elections #politics #unitedkingdom #uk
I can't even predict who I'll vote for yet, nevermind anyone else.



 

Why bother?


I thought truth didn't exist by itself. That to approach it, you have to carefully collect evidence from many sources that together point at a strong probability of truth. I thought people creating their own truth out of nothing existed but were rare.

With the Brexit vote and Trump's election, I admit now I was wrong. In retrospect, I was one of these people creating their own truth. That their number was not enough to have a decisive impact on the course of events was just baseless wishful thinking on my part.

It turns out everybody is creating their own truth to some degree, and words are meaningless. Especially the big words like freedom, justice, science or journalism. Now that I know that, I'm wondering if it always was like that or that it worsened over the last decade or so.

Fueled by a click-based economy, many made-up news websites saw the light of day during that time period. At the same time, regular news outlets were culling their staff because actual journalism is expensive and online ads have diminishing returns. This produced poorly sourced article... show more


 

About Hillary Clinton and false equivalencies


(reposted from

Mrpetovan: KAOS

)

There are currently no other country as large and populous as the USA where there is a multiple party (at least 2) system. The scale of the USA means that to get to the top of the political ladder, being nice doesn't even start to cut it, because it's naturally easier to play on fears than good feelings, and special interest groups are powerful.

To be fair with Hillary Clinton, she has taken way more shit than any of her male colleagues. It wasn't always baseless, but the magnitude of the criticism often was blown up out of proportions, partly because she was associated with Bill Clinton, partly because she is a woman.

Despite the train wreck of a campaign that Donald Trump rode from the very beginning, I'm pretty sure the media had to find some sort of false equivalencies in order to have a more exciting (and profiting) close race between the main candidates even though it probably wasn't al... show more
This entry was edited (1 year ago)